Oracle Cloud Marketplace

If you are an Oracle Cloud customer or a partner, or are considering becoming one, or if you are just interested, you should check out the Oracle Cloud Marketplace.  It follows the type App Store type model that you are probably familiar with, but this is for cloud based enterprise apps.

oracle cloud marketplaceI am always inspired by the innovation that comes from the Oracle partners, it drives me to try and keep innovating in the products Oracle produces and that is how the ecosystem should work.  I see a lot of content on their already and I plan to try out some of the free apps over the next days and weeks, maybe I will do reviews of anything I find particularly interesting.  However you shouldn’t wait for my reviews, get over there now and check out the content, post in the comments to discuss what you find.

Trivial Software?

All software is hard.  Building good software is not trivial, but the challenges I face are different depending the intended use of my software.  For me it helps if I put software into three categories

  1. Critical – this controls nuclear power plants, medical equipment or aircraft control systems.  If it breaks a lot of people die.
  2. Enterprise Class – If it breaks I cannot run my business (pay my suppliers, pay my employees, serve my customers)
  3. Trivial – If it breaks I can’t check the latest sports results, or post my opinions on my lunch to facebook and twitter

The tolerance of the consumers of each of the above software for failure is quite different and as such the speed with which new features can be delivered and implemented will differ.  If the pilot of your plane sees a pop up on his screen right before he takes off saying “An update is available for your autopilot software, would you like to install it now?”;  would you want him to click ‘Yes’?

I build Enterprise software, which is the middle ground.  I certainly have to spend a lot of my time ensuring that what we build is robust and reliable, but there is plenty of scope to innovate.  I respect the people who build there other types of software as they each have their own unique challenges.  Critical software has to be totally safe and reliable and those pressures are obvious.  What I class as trivial software is a challenge because you have to move with the market and bring out new features and innovations very fast and keep your customers very happy and engaged because they can move easily to another product.  What is trivial software to the users may well be critical to your ability to make money and pay your own bills.

Do you agree with my categories, or do you prefer to slice it another way?  Is trying to categorize software a futile exercise?  Am I just trying to be controversial by calling some people’s life passion trivial?  Have your say in the comments below.

To cc:, or not to cc:, that is the question

One of my favorite Oracle Bloggers, Floyd Teter often uses Rock Lyrics quotes to open his posts.  I’ve blogged before about email management (26,138 Emails in My Inbox (and I feel fine) using a play on an REM song, but I thought I’d be a little more upscale today and go with Shakespear.

That is the question
To be, or not to be, that is the question.

I decided to write this post in response to a post on the Talented Apps blog, by Sri Subramanian discussing how we process lots of information from feeds, twitter and emails and mentioning that adding people to the cc: on an email is ok as long as the subject is good so they can filter.  I disagree.  There is a very big difference between email and feeds (RSS, twitter, facebook feed, blogs etc), one is like me going to a bookstore and browsing and the other is like junk mail, let’s compare the two.

Junk mail –  somebody gets my address and specifically sends a message to me and it is delivered right to my door and I have to look at it and chuck into the recycle bin that I keep close to where I pick up my mail.  If I don’t like something I’m sent, I cannot easily stop them sending more.

Bookstore – I look around for a bookstore I like the look of and I go in and navigate to the sections of interest and look around maybe thumb through a few, maybe buy some and read them fully, or not.  I decide when I leave and if I go back there again.

In summary the difference is that email (or junk snail mail) is not on my terms.  I opt in to feeds (or bookstores) and I can opt out whenever I like, but email I have no choice it comes to my inbox and I have to deal with it.  I can set up filters, but that is error prone because I may filter something that I need and miss it.

I love feeds and information flowing from them are great, because it is on my terms but I think people sending emails have some responsibility to attempt to cc: only people that need to know.

What’s your opinion on the topic, is it ok to cc: everyone on your mail, just in case they are interested?  Let me know in the comments section.

photo credit:  StreetAlbum

http://www.flickr.com/photos/streetalbum/3102886548/in/photostream/

[The RISA mentioned in the photo is a company that paints over graffiti – some say it is cleaning up, some say it is destroying street art]

Driving 2.0 – Socializing The Freeway

I drive from San Francisco down the Highway 101 to Oracle HQ everyday (sometimes on a Saturday too), I sometimes see people I know on the freeway, I often see the same cars, I certainly see people do (IMHO) idiotic things and I occasionally see people do (IMHO) courteous and considerate things.

So an idea came to me as I passed the ebay commuter bus the other day. Why can’t I rate the drivers on the freeway just like I rate sellers and buyers on ebay? You cut me up, you get a thumbs down, I see you driving whilst eating a bowl of cereal thumbs down for you, if you let me change lane safely I can give a thumbs up. Sound like fantasy land?  Well it could be easily done, I can see your registration easily enough I snap a picture of Continue reading “Driving 2.0 – Socializing The Freeway”

Connections improve productivity – Quelle Surprise

Thanks to Oracle nerd for this post, referencing an article on CIO magazine. Apparantly connected employees are more productive. I thought this was a no brainer, if I know a lot of people I can get help and advice from a lot of people, equally if I know a lot of stuff people want to stay connected to me so they can pick my brains and get their job done.

The article goes into more depth and backs it’s argument up with stats, research and references, but I’m a blogger not a journalist. I think the paragraph above is obvious so I state it as my opinion and I’m done. For more detail on my ideas around what I call dev 2.0 you can read my original post, if you want to see it in action – you need to come and join my team, or maybe offer me a job (Boss – if you’re reading, this is a joke).