My Favorite Enterprise Blockchain Articles

For the past few years I have been working on Blockchain for Enterprises, and I get a lot of questions about where to get started.  There are a lot of complicated explanations about the technology of blockchain, but I try to talk about how Blockchain (or Distributed Ledger Technology) is different to traditional databases; where it can be useful and how it will be adopted.  If these things interest you too, then you will find the articles below a good starting point.  I’m thrilled that I have had articles published in some prestigious publications, I hope you enjoy them.  As always, I love feedback and discussions so please share your thoughts in the comments section below.

Forbes: 4 Real World Blockchain Use Cases

These four design patterns are a good way to categorize use cases and also stimulate ideas for use cases in your industry.

Channel Futures: Making Sense of Where Blockchain Can Impact Your Business

This is a more comprehensive (but very readable) explanation of the four patterns of use cases in a guest blog post I authored back in 2017.

Wall Street Journal: Why Blockchain Will Fundamentally Change Corporate Finance

This article captures a lot of important points in how back office functions will be impacted by Blockchain technology.

Database Trends and Applications: Why Permissioned Blockchain Technology Is Important to Enterprises

My article explains how blockchains are different to a database and why for some applications they are a better option.  It was exciting to have this highlighted on the cover of the print edition last year.

Forbes: What Will Spark The Blockchain Explosion?

Some thoughts on where we will see the enterprise uptakes and what factors are needed for the “Killer App” to evolve.

Bloomberg Accounting Blog: Lack of Consensus Reigns with Blockchain

I was interviewed for this article after presenting at a conference, I like that they opened with:

“one of the common bifurcations of blockchain types is between private and public blockchains, such as explained here in a blog on the AICPA website. David Haimes, believes this to be a “false dichotomy.”

The article is a good read and I get to explain the differences between Permissioned versus Permissionless Blockchain networks.

 

 

Is Your Job At Risk Of Automation?

Knowledge worker’s jobs will be able to be replaced with automation and it will happen faster than we expect. I think the pace of change will accelerate because new technology is now so easy to adopt in the cloud and innovations are rolled out faster than ever before.

Last week I blogged about Automated Accountants, which was discussing chatbot use cases rather than full automation of a person. However the concept of automating what knowledge workers do today to the point were we really do have a fully automated accountant is something I have been researching too.

I had a twitter discussion with Vinnie Mirchandani (@dealarchitect) about automation as he is authoring a book on the subject.  I agree with him that dirty and dangerous jobs are the first candidates for automation, but I also believe knowledge jobs are good candidates too and it will happen faster than many expect.  In the world of finance we have seen continual adoption of technology to move us from paper based Ledgers to highly automated cloud accounting software with integrated reporting, social networks, mobile etc. I think the pace of change will accelerate because new technology is now so easy to adopt in the cloud and innovations are rolled out faster than ever before.  So automation will happen quicker for those corporations that are already adopting these cloud based business applications.

I came across an interesting article on the BBC entitled Will a Robot Take My Job? which has some nice tools to let you search for your job and determine how likely it is to be automated and despite my earlier assertions I was surprised that accounting professions were so high on the list of those that would be automated.  You can see my summary graphic below

automation

The full report from Oxford University’s Martin School is worth a read as it goes into a lot of detail of skills that are hard for a machine to replicate and those that are easier so you can understand the reasoning behind the ratings.  My profession in software development has a pretty low chance of being automated, I have to come up with original ideas and negotiate and these are things it is harder (at the moment) for machines to automate but it might just be a matter of time.

This will not happen in one shot, but over time more and more tasks will be automated, which is good because it will give is some time to think about the much bigger issue; what do we do now so much of what we as a workforce do is automated?  The common wisdom is the workers will gradually move to work on higher value tasks that cannot easily be automated and drive greater and greater value.  There is a lot of evidence to support this, but that discussion probably deserves a blog post of it’s own.